Protestors barricade a street during protests against an increase in taxation as a consequence of new social reforms and voice their dismay with the neoliberal policies of President Ortega on April 20, 2018 in Managua, Nicaragua. (Carlos Herrera/DPA/Zuma Press/TNS)

Just two weeks ago, we reported that a slim majority of Mormon missionaries serving in Nicaragua would be transferred out of the country due to political unrest. Now, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints has announced that the remaining 158 missionaries will also be removed from the country temporarily.

According to Church spokesman Daniel Woodruff, the missionaries are being moved to temporary assignments in North and South America, the Caribbean, and New Zealand. One of those things is not like the others. Tad Walch of the Deseret News noted that the president of the Nicaragua Managua South Mission, Mark Brown, has already returned with his family to the United States. The president of the Managua North Mission, on the other hand, has stayed in the country to “handle ecclesiastical responsibilities for local LDS church members,” per Fox 13 Utah.

The Church has placed greater emphasis on missionary safety in recent years, even asking missionaries throughout the world to participate in surveys that will help gauge policy from the Missionary Department.

Whether or when missionaries will return to Nicaragua remains to be seen. Someone needs to help do the good work to prepare for Latin America’s newest temple.