Torreón Mexico

Joe: As we venture into the realm of where temples are sparse in Mexico, in the states of Sinaloa and Durango we see a big open mountainous area not unlike Northern Nevada. Not many towns, not many people. Not many wards or branches.

With the dangers of Sinaloa state, the coastal populations where you’ll find many wards and branches might prove tricky for establishing the social stability needed for a temple construction project. Then again, a temple has been announced (finally) for Nicaragua, so we may be surprised.

But consider instead Torreón in Durango. A town technically inside the 200 mile radius of the Monterey temple, although only barely. A temple there amid its several wards and branches would not only serve the city well, but be an outpost for the vast countryside of the rest of Durango and much of Sinaloa.

Mexico benefited greatly from the Hinckley-era mini temples, and perhaps the best approach to continue to bring the presence of the temples to more of God’s children in this part of the world is to continue what good ol’ Gordon started by bringing more small temples to feasible outposts throughout the nation. A mini temple in Torreón could make perfect sense in that regard.

Geoff: You intrigue me. The map says it all. Torreón is right on the periphery of the Monterrey Mexico Temple’s 200-mile radius, and most of northern Mexico is without a temple until you hit some of the border areas. I dig. Five stakes in Torreón? Two stakes in Durango?A few other areas built out? To quote the inimitable Mark Hoppus, I’m feeling this.

So long as it’s not one of the actual mini temples, which we’ve discovered have some architectural problems, I think we’re good. I think mini temple 2.0 might be in order.