Artist’s rendering of the Quito Ecuador Temple | Intellectual Reserve

Concurrent with the announcement of the groundbreaking of the Lima Peru Los Olivos Temple, today The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints revealed the groundbreaking date for the Quito Ecuadro Temple on May 11, 2019. Elder Enrique R. Falabella, South America Northwest Area President, will preside at this event as well as the groundbreaking in Lima a few months alter.

The temple was announced during the 186th Annual General Conference by President Thomas S. Monson, and nearly three years will pass between announcement and groundbreaking, which is not uncommon. The gap between announcement and groundbreaking is significantly less than that of Ecuador’s first temple, in coastal Guayaquil, where nearly 14 years lapsed between announcement and construction, with an eventual dedication in 1999. Ecuador boasts just over 240,000 members of the Church, with 39 stakes and 1 existing temple.

The temple design itself looks similar to the country’s other temple, maybe even using the same Brazilian Marble that was used for its predecessor. Unlike some of its contemporaries, which we have written about, the Quito temple’s central spire is topped by a statue of the angel Moroni. For those interested or who are familiar with the area, you can actually see an aerial view of the future temple grounds.

Quito is known to be the highest capital city in the world, rising to 9,350 feet above see level. Quito is the second most populous city in Ecuador, with 2.5 million people, and has seven operating stakes. Prior to the announcement of the Quito Temple, Ecuador was the country with the highest number of members with only one temple. Members of the Church in Quito currently have to travel 270 miles to reach the country’s only temple in Guayaquil, and this will be a welcome blessing for them.

Fun facts: the functional currency of Ecuador is the US Dollar. Ecuador also has the same power outlets and voltage as the United States. Basically, missionaries who serve in Ecuador don’t have to adjust to much. Also, Ecuador’s president, Lenín Moreno, is the only head of state in the world to use a wheelchair.